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Sunny Nash Wins Grant to Present School Cultural Heritage Program

Sunny Nash, Author-Journalist

Sunny Nash, Author-Journalist-Photographer

Sunny Nash will present a cultural heritage preservation program in Spring 2017 at Smith Elementary School, renamed in 2015 in honor of Bobbie Smith, the first African American elected to the Long Beach Unified School District Board of Education.

“Everyone has a legacy, even children,” said Sunny Nash, three-time winner of Arts Council for Long Beach Professional Artist Fellowships (2003, 2009 & 2014), a 2016 Arts Council for Long Beach Micro-Grant, and recipient of a 2016 American Business Women’s Association Shine Award. “Being a journalist, I am comfortable with research, fact-checking and history, integral components in constructing news and legacy, Nash said.

The cultural heritage preservation program for K-5 students at Smith Elementary will include a literary reading, from Nash’s book, Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s, select articles from her nationally syndicated newspaper column about life with her part-Comanche grandmother during the Civil Rights Movement. The book is recognized by the Association of American University Presses as a book for understanding U.S. race relations, and recommended by the Miami-Dade (Florida) Public Library System for Native American Collections.

“I hope to acquaint students with the responsibility of controlling, documenting and preserving legacies they can start building right away,” Nash said. “This can be the beginning of what they leave to the American national treasure. I began building my own legacy at that age. If we convince students early enough how important it is to evaluate and edit their life choices and activities, and to document and preserve artifacts representing those choices and activities, we can change the world.”

Based on her recognition in U.S. race relations research, Sunny Nash writes a popular blog: Race Relation in America.

Nash will also host an interactive lecture, demonstrations, student discussions and an Exhibition, How a Child Builds Legacy, supported in part by the Arts Council for Long Beach; Alta Cooke, the first African American principal of a Long Beach high school, David Starr Jordan; and the City of Long Beach, California.

Bobbie Smith, for whom Smith Elementary was named, said, “I am very pleased to have Sunny Nash present her work and interact with students at Smith Elementary. I have known and worked with Sunny on many projects through the years and appreciate her dedication to contribute to the culture of Long Beach.”

Bobbie Smith Front of School

Bobbie Smith – Bobbie Smith Elementary School, named in her honor in 2015; Smith was the first African American elected to the Long Beach Unified School District Board of Education, where she served 16 years as president; Smith was the first African American women elected to public office in Long Beach, California; and Smith was the First African American Head Librarian and Faculty Senate President at Long Beach City College. (Photo: by Sunny Nash)

Smith Elementary Principal Monica Alas said, “Mrs. Bobbie Smith has been a role model to all of my students since the school was re-named in December of 2015. Her partnership with Sunny Nash will benefit our students with the exhibition highlighting authentic published journal entries and unique art collection.”

Sunny Nash earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Journalism and Mass Communications from Texas A&M University; a Postgraduate Diploma in Online Instruction and Technology from the University of California, San Diego; and an Adjunct Professor Graduate Certificate from the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Arizona State University through the Poynter Institute. Nash studied Visual and Information Literacy at the Simmons College, Graduate School of Library and Information Science in Boston, Massachusetts; and Career and Technical Education at Texas A&M University. Nash earned Research Methodology and Digital Records Preservation certificates at the U.S. Library of Congress and U.S. National Archives and Records Administration in Washington DC; Texas State Library and Archives in Austin; Idaho Commission for Libraries in Boise; and the University of London.

Nash completed U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Certificate programs in Cultural Heritage Management; Cultural Resource Management; Archaeological Collections Management; Archaeology Interpretation; Interpretive Archaeology; Communications and Records; and Archaeology Administration, Law and Ethics. Recently, Nash wrote a DOI Cultural Heritage Case Study about the preservation of her childhood home. Her study reveals the historical relevance of a family that seemed typical during the mid-twentieth century when Nash was the age of Smith Elementary students to whom she will be presenting the cultural heritage preservation program.

“When I was growing up, I certainly did not think my family and my home were significant,” Nash said. “And the house does not and has never contained anything of any commercial value. However, my mother taught me to start saving little pieces of our existence and that is what I did, including family stories I heard from the elders. I want to show Smith Elementary students how to preserve and organize their journal entries, digital data, artwork, photographs, keepsakes, report cards, ticket stubs, concert programs and memorabilia to create a lasting record of how they spent their lives, similar to collections of notable historical figures archived in repositories. I want students to understand, though, that they do not have to be famous or have a lot of money in order to build a legacy they can be proud to preserve for posterity.”

The wisdom of her construction contractor, Julian Narro, led Nash to realize that her modest wood-frame childhood home may have more purpose than a shelter for commonplace household belongings her late parents left behind. “The home may have historic importance if rehabilitated properly,” Narro said. “We have to be careful not to change things too much and to use replacement materials that match the original construction materials.”

Building on her DOI Cast Study, Nash’s cultural heritage program at Smith Elementary will look beyond the structure and examine what may be commonly mistaken for junk. Although the contents of her childhood home have no resale value, Nash will demonstrate that select items in the house possess historical characteristics, as do items she will encourage the students to preserve. To demonstrate the historical worth of their collections, she will exhibit published column reproductions, based on her own childhood memories.

Students will be instructed in simple methods of preservation, care and storage their personal treasures.

Roscoe slide

Uncle Roscoe’s City by Sunny Nash Illustrated by Internationally Renowned Swedish Artist, Rolf Laub

 

Drawn from her childhood, Nash’s newspaper articles were originally published in the State Lines Section of Texas Magazine in the Sunday Edition of The Houston Chronicle, and syndicated nationally by Hearst, Knight-Ridder and Black Conscience Syndication of New York.

“To most people, these articles would simply be old faded newspapers,” Nash said. “But to research scholars, these old faded newspapers represent historical archaeology. And even if they do not represent anything of any scholarly value right now, I think we should get our students into the habit of cultural preservation and historical archaeology, saving what they feel should be kept because we do not know what researchers will be looking for in the future. Preservation helps all of us become stewards of our culture and society, and gives us a sense of pride and desire to protect our neighbors and communities.”

Sunny Nash’s journalism and photojournalism are collected by the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC, Schomburg Center in New York, Library of Congress in Washington DC, U.S. Presidential Libraries, university archives, academic collections and international libraries and museums. These items represent Nash’s life in the home where she grew up with her parents and maternal grandmother, Bigmama. “At the time I was writing these articles about my family, home, neighborhood and dreams, I had no idea they would ever serve any educational purpose, be syndicated all over the world or be collected in a book,” Nash said.

From 2005-2008, Nash won YMCA grants to conduct after-school classical music, literature and photography programs in Southern California elementary  schools. Nash also won grants to conduct literary and photography programs in Houston, Cleveland, New York, Newark, Santa Fe, Nashville, Philadelphia and Los Angeles.

For decades, Nash–who completed several U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) programs in First Amendment Rights, Communications and Law, Crime Scene Investigation (CSI), Forensics, and Population Genetics–has conducted literary and photography workshops in juvenile and adult criminal justice facilities around the country; published articles on juvenile justice; contributed to scholarly publications on crime; and spoken nationwide to diverse audiences on reducing crime through participation in the arts, historical projects and cultural preservation.

Sunny Nash designed Juvenile Art Programs to Help Center's Students

Sunny Nash Designed Juvenile Art Program in Mask Making to Help Juvenile Center’s Students Learn New Methods of Expression

“These activities have important effects on students–encouraging them to appreciate and protect the culture of their communities,” Nash said. “I want people to lift their vision, and develop a sense of worth other than financial and not think of their world, their existence in the world and the people in their world as disposable commodities. I want them to see this place where we all live as our world, a place we need to care for and build legacy around, based on human values, and not simply on monetary wealth.”

Sunny Nash Producer of the Year Award

Sunny Nash Producer of the Year Award

In 2006, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., invited Sunny Nash to join Harvard University’s African American National Biography, an eight-volume collection published by Oxford University Press in 2008 and now online. Winner of a 2014 National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Award to moderate the national series, Created Equal, Nash was also a 2015 finalist for a Guggenheim Award, nominated by former Houston Chronicle publisher, Tony Pederson. Recognized by Women in Photography International, Nash’s photographs are currently touring internationally with the Smithsonian Exhibition, Reflections in Black: a history of black photographers, 1840-present, published as a reference volume in 2000 by W.W. Norton in New York. Nash’s historic photographic and document reproductions, and oral histories, The Peterson Legacy, exhibited at the George H.W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, won a 2014 Ottis Lock Endowment Award & Research Grant. Nash received the Charter Communications 2004 Television Producer of the Year Award and, while under contract at the University of Texas Health Science Center UTTV, she won a nomination for the Robert F. Kennedy Documentary Journalism Award.

Through its mission: To foster creativity and culture, enlivening communities and enabling a thriving economy, the Arts Council for Long Beach is a private 501(c) 3 non-profit organization that promotes and advocates for the arts, helps fund Long Beach, California, artists like Sunny Nash, arts organizations and arts projects, and encourages private individuals and donors, to give and support artists and projects like the cultural heritage preservation program Nash will be presenting next year to students at Smith Elementary School.

© 2016 Sunny Nash

Sunny Nash Fulfills Carnegie Installment

Photographers can learn from curator, Sunny Nash, how to research, restore and reproduce historical photographs and documents to create image archives for digital preservation formats and online exhibitions.

 

Sunny Nash installed historical materials at the Carnegie History Center in Bryan, Texas, through a grant from the East Texas Historical Association (ETHA) pertaining to her study, The Peterson Legacy: Images & Words, an oral history and exhibition of antique photographs, military records, deeds and marriage licenses, which were displayed last year at the George H.W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum.

Lock 5 Volumes

Five Hard Cover Volumes Peterson Papers, Documentation & Research

ETHA established the Ottis Lock Endowment Award and Research Grant in 1984 to commemorate Ottis Lock for lifelong interest in the history, heritage and folklore of East Texas. The grant allows expansion of a contribution by research team, headed by Shawn Carlson, of which Nash and Sue Winton Moss were members, at the Texas A&M University Center for Environmental Archaeology, commissioned in 1993 by the State of Texas. Nash conducted oral history interviews, restored and reproduced historic photographs and papers; collected genealogical data, ancestral memorabilia, military records, deeds, marriage licenses, letters and church history; and conducted an Ancestry “Case Study: From Oral History to Excavation,” which qualified Nash for the Lock grant for further research on the rural East Texas landowners.

Peterson Lifeways book cover

African-American Lifeways in East-Central Texas

The final, African-American Lifeways in East-Central Texas: The Ned Peterson Farmstead, helped facilitate nomination of the 19th Century Peterson farmstead to the National Register of Historic Places in Washington D.C. “The research is a micro-cosmic examination of rural black life–19th Century through the present,” Nash said. To attract global online audiences to this historical study, Nash will employ the principles of the emerging discipline—visual literacy—a teachable set of skills that enables a person to understand a subject by viewing photographs, documents, illustrations, charts and graphs.

Sunny Nash - Peterson Exhibition at Bush Pres. Library

George H.W. Bush Presidential Library & Museum “The Peterson Legacy”  Curated by Sunny Nash

Nash introduced plans to create an exhibition of her research in a speech to the College Station Historic Preservation Committee, and received a Lock grant this year to enhance the exhibition with discussion aids, handbook, online scholarly research guide, and five volumes of original research documents, which are now at the Carnegie.

“Combined with text, visuals and oral history have intrinsic qualities to allow more critical examination, extraction and interpretation of meaning,” Nash said. “And pique viewers’ curiosity in a shared past, present and future. The Lock research grant allows me to become part of that future in attracting global online audiences to the study of history.”

Sunny Nash earned a Bachelor of Arts, School of Journalism, Texas A&M University; Graduate Certificate, Instructional Technology, University of California, San Diego; Adjunct Professor Specialization, Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Communications, Arizona State University; Professional Development, igital & Visual Literacy, Simmons Graduate School of Library & Information Science.

Bigmama Didn't Shop At Woolworth's

Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s

Nash’s book, Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s, about life with her part-Comanche grandmother during the Civil Rights Movement was selected by the Association of American University Presses for its value to understanding U.S. race relations; and the Miami-Dade Public Library System recommends Nash’s book for Native American collections. Women in Photography International recognizes Nash for photographs collected for the Smithsonian Exhibition and international tour, Reflections in Black. A resident of Southern California, Nash is a three-time winner of Arts Council for Long Beach (California) Artist Fellowships (2003, 2009, 2014).

 

Sunny Nash on Artist Panel

(Photo: Ebony Hamilton)  Sunny Nash Documents Storefront Churches

(Photo: Ebony Hamilton)
Sunny Nash & Exhibition Display
Shopping for Hope: a photographic study of storefront churches across America

Sunny Nash, internationally acclaimed photojournalist, author and three-time winner of a Long Beach Professional Artist Fellowship, will be on an artist panel to discuss the popular exhibition, REINVENTORY, at the Collaborative Gallery along with the other 2015 Professional Artist Fellows and exhibition curators of .

The artist panel on Thursday, August 20th from 5–7pm, to discuss the REINVENTORY Exhibition, which opened on July 10, 2015, with a reception for about 250 guests, is an encore event before the show closes, Saturday, August 22.

Appearing on the panel with Nash will be dramatist, storyteller and performer, Yulya Dukhovny; award-winning filmmaker,Pamela K. Johnson; Textile artist, social activist and scholar, Carole Frances Lung; and award-winning artist, Olga Lah; and curators, Marco Schindelmann, Artist Professor of Voice and Director of the University Opera at the University of Redlands, who has performed as a soloist, throughout Europe and Japan, and Kamran Assadi, who has for many years been an advocate, active member and creative leader in the Long Beach arts community.

keeper 2

Sunny Nash

“I absolutely love how the curators handled my storefront church images,” Nash said. “I would never have thought of the arrangement they chose. So much of the success of an exhibit depends on how curators place the art. It definitely affects how art patrons view and respond to the work.”

Sunny Nash, recognized by Women in Photography International, uses literature and visual media to preserve history, and to document contemporary urban life. Nash’s part of the REINVENTORY Exhibition includes a selection of 20 images from her collection, Shopping for Hope: a photographic study of storefront churches across America–New York, Houston, Los Angeles, Newark, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Santa Fe and Nashville.

The Collaborative Gallery is located at 421 W. Broadway in Long Beach, California. For information on this event and other Long Beach arts news, contact Cynthia Lujan of the Arts Council for Long Beach.

Sunny Nash Documents Storefront Churches

Sunny Nash Author & Photojournalist

Sunny Nash
Author & Photojournalist

Photojournalist Sunny Nash first began her collection, Shopping for Hope, a study of storefront churches across America,” 20 years ago when the U.S. was experiencing a rise in violence occurring in urban, and especially storefront, churches.

“Churches were burning, ministers were being attacked and killed,” Nash said. “But those incidents were not the the only reason for my fascination with storefront churches. I saw these structures as representing an integral part of American culture and folklore, expressions of hope in hopeless neighborhoods. And they were disappearing before my eyes. In some cities, I was there days ahead of the wrecking ball.”

Nash, recognized by Women in Photography International, uses literature and visual media to preserve history, and to document contemporary urban life. A selection of 40 of the Nash Shopping for Hope images from New York, Houston, Los Angeles, Newark, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Santa Fe and Nashville will be on display at the Collaborative Gallery, 421 W. Broadway, Long Beach, California, in honor of her 2015 Arts Council for Long Beach Artist Fellowship.

Screen Door Church by Sunny  Nash

Screen Door Church by Sunny Nash

The show curators, Marco Schindelmann and Kamran Assadi, will also feature works by other 2015 Arts Council for Long Beach Artist Fellowship recipients, who appeared together at the Long Beach Museum of Art. They include: Dramatist, storyteller and performer, Yulya Dukhovny; award-winning filmmaker, Pamela K. Johnson; Textile artist, social activist and scholar, Carole Frances Lung; and award-winning artist, Olga Lah. Curator, Marco Schindelmann, Artist Professor of Voice and Director of the University Opera at the University of Redlands, has performed as a soloist, throughout Europe and Japan. Curator, Kamran Assadi, has for many years been an advocate, active member and creative leader in the Long Beach arts community.

Reflections in Black: a History of Black Photographers, 1840 - Present

Reflections in Black: a History of Black Photographers, 1840 – Present

“I began photographing storefront churches in Houston in 1989,” Nash said. “And those burglar-barred structures with crooked crosses landed me a cover story when I was a columnist for the Houston Chronicle’s Texas Magazine. From there, I got a feature on ABC Network, Good Morning Houston, and an exhibition at the Houston Public Library. Soon, I got an invitation to speak at the Holocaust Museum symposium, “Church Burnings: A Community Response, A Town Hall Panel Discussion.”

In 1991, New York’s Schomburg Center for the Study of Black Culture began collecting Nash’s Hope images, and featured Nash photographs in a Schomburg symposium on religion in America. In 1992, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. acquired 52 images for its inventory on religion. In 2001, two of Nash’s photographs toured internationally with Smithsonian Exhibition, Reflections in Black: a history of black photographers, 1840 – the present, which was published by W.W. Norton.

Sunny Nash is the author of Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s about life with her part-Comanche grandmother during the Civil Rights Movement, a best-selling memoir selected by the Association of American University Presses as a book for understanding U.S. race relations; and recommended by the Miami-Dade Public Library System in Florida for Native American collections. www.sunnynash.blogspot.com

ushistory.org homepage

© 2015 Sunny Nash. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.

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Sunny Nash Honored

Sunny Nash

Sunny Nash

The FOCUS Learning Community at Texas A&M University (TAMU) honored Sunny Nash with a FOCUS Block.

FOCUS (Foundations of Continued Undergraduate Success) is a mentoring and personal growth program for first-year TAMU Regents’ Scholars, who meet and interact with or learn about Sunny Nash, and other graduates and professionals associated with the University, such as Robert Gates—former TAMU president (1999-2001), 22nd U.S. Secretary of Defense (2006-2011), under two presidents, George W. Bush and Barack Obama, and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom–whose FOCUS Block has also been created.

In the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Veterinary Medicine, Science, and the Health Science Center School of Public Health, FOCUS introduces students to a unique learning experience through FOCUS Blocks. The blocks represent an array of fields and academic areas through professionals like Nash–a 1977 TAMU graduate, among the first dozen black women[1] and the first African American to graduate with a degree in journalism [2]–who won a nomination for a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for television documentaries in education and medicine. The work was collected by the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston in 1992.

In addition to its mentoring program, FOCUS also provides professional staff guidance and coordinated monthly activities for students. Students may also participate in the optional Keathley Hall Living-Learning Community. “Having a FOCUS Block[3] is an opportunity to share with students my years of studying at the University, and the professional career I pursued afterwards,” Nash said. “I hope I have done something in my life that will help others.”

Bigmama Didn't Shop At Woolworth's by Sunny Nash

Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s by Sunny Nash

Regarded by contemporary reviewers as a leading writer on race relations in America,[4] Sunny Nash is the author of Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s about life with her part-Comanche grandmother during the Civil Rights Movement, selected by the Association of American University Presses for understanding U.S. race relations, and recommended by the Florida Miami-Dade Public Library System for Native American Collections.

In 2015, Nash received the Ottis Lock Endowment Research Grant and Award. Named California writing Fellow in 2009 and 2015[6], Nash is published in anthologies, journals, magazines and historical publications; collected in literary volumes; and cited by popular and scholarly references. In 2014, Nash received a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant to moderate a panel on the NEH program, Created Equal,[7] at the Carnegie History Center. In 2007, Nash joined Harvard University’s African American National Biography[8] (Oxford University Press, 2008). Charter Communications named Nash 2004 TV Producer of the Year. In 2003, Nash won a California Public Corporation for the Arts Fellowship.

Reflections in Black: a History of Black Photographers, 1840 - Present

Reflections in Black: a History of Black Photographers, 1840 – Present

In 1999, Nash joined the Smithsonian project, Reflections in Black: a History of Black Photographers, 1840-Present, (W.W. Norton, New York, 2000), and her images toured internationally with the Smithsonian exhibition.[9] Recognized by Women in Photography International and the African American Photographers Guild, Nash’s photography is collected by the Schomburg Museum in New York; and the Smithsonian in Washington D.C.

“When I was attending Texas A&M University, I never thought of myself as a pioneer. I was simply a student trying to graduate from a University I had been observing since childhood from my Candy Hill neighborhood. As it turns out, three Candy Hill girls were among the first black women to graduate; all of us in the 1970s, my neighbors and school friends–Karen Walton (’70), who became the first female African American Texas A&M graduate, and Lillian Lucas (‘71), the second.”

Sunny Nash, a popular blogger on Race Relations in America, a national speaker and former syndicated newspaper columnist, is a broadcast journalism and mass communications graduate of Texas A&M University, and studied Visual Literacy at Simmons College Graduate School of Information and Library Science in Boston, and Instructional Technology at the University of California, San Diego. Sunny Nash lives in Southern California.

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[1] Intended for All, 125 Years of Women at Texas A&M, http://www.aggiewomen.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/AM_Women.pdf

[2] Fulfillment of a Dream African Americans at Texas A&M University, http://archiveexhibits.library.tamu.edu/africanamerican/studentlife/index.html

[3] Sunny Nash FOCUS Block, http://focus.tamu.edu/blocks/nash.aspx

[4] Jim Crow in the American West, http://sunnynash.blogspot.com/2011/04/african-american-west.html

[5] Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s, http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-89096-716-4

[6] Sunny Nash California Artist Profile, http://www.artslb.org/aclb-registry/2/page-artist.php?slug=682

[7] NEH, http://www.bcslibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/NEH_Loving.pdf

[8] African American National Biography, http://www.pw.org/content/sunny_nash

[9] Reflections in Black International Tour, http://aavad.com/artistbibliog.cfm?id=2975

[10] RFK Award Noination, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-YKHpC8hus

Sunny Nash Wins Endowment Award in History

Sunny Nash

Sunny Nash

“As a journalist, I learned many years ago that news is history in the making,” said Sunny Nash, winner of the 2014-15 Ottis Lock Endowment Award and Research Grant. “As a writer-photographer, my goal with the Lock grant is to attract audiences to history.”

Through historical research, photographic restoration and archival document reproduction Nash plans to develop approaches that excite audiences about history,  employing principles of an emerging classroom and library discipline—visual literacy—a teachable set of skills that enables a person to understand a subject by viewing images, such as photographs, documents, illustrations, charts and graphs. “I will combine technology-based visual and aural literacy with digital literacy derived from reading texts to engage several modes of learning and enhance the study and understanding of history.”

Nash’s visual literacy model to complete her photographic and oral history study, The Peterson Legacy, will depict a micro-cosmic examination of early African American life, a perfect enticement to bring academic researchers, and university and local school students into libraries and others from around the globe onto a scholarly online research guide, which Nash will develop using the Lock grant. “Online research is an ordinary part of any student of researcher’s life, one reason a guide about the Peterson family and homestead will be so useful,” said Nash, who was part of the original archaeological team that facilitated the nomination of the family farm to the 19th Century Peterson farmstead in southern Brazos County to the National Register of Historic Places in Washington D.C.

“Scholars need to be able to find as many trustworthy sources of information on a topic in one place as possible,” Nash said. “That is simply the way the academic world and the rest of the world, for that matter, exist today. Most every aspect of life involves some form of technology.”

“The Peterson historic photographic restorations, oral history interviews and antique document reproductions have intrinsic qualities that penetrate deeper than the surface of standard data collection, allowing a more critical examination, extraction and interpretation of meaning,” Nash said. I guess my treatment of those qualities are what helped me to win the Lock Award. A combination of visuals, written text and oral history gives the viewer a glimpse of cultural history and may pique curiosity in a shared past, present and future.”

 

Winning Artists Appear at Museum of Art

Long Beach Musuem of Art

Long Beach Museum of Art Long Beach, California

Long Beach Museum of Art Free Event  

Sunny NashYulya Dukhovny, Pamela K. Johnson, Olga Lah and Carole Frances Lung–the first all-female group to win Arts Council for Long Beach Professional Artist Fellowships in one year–will appear at the Long Beach Museum of Art on Thursday evening, March 26, 2015, at 6:30. Seating is limited. For more information, please visit the Long Beach Museum of Art. Email museum@lbma.org.

Thursday the Long Beach Museum of Art presents a panel discussion, Feminism Ideals, moderated by Victoria Bryan, Executive Director of Arts Council for Long Beach (ACLB). The panel, featuring winners of this year’s Arts Council for Long Beach Professional Artists Fellowships, will discuss the roles of women in broad artistic projects that enrich the cultural ambiance of Long Beach, California.

Sunny Nash Author & Photojournalist

Sunny Nash
Author & Photojournalist

Author and photojournalist, Sunny Nash, three-time winner of Arts Council for Long Beach Professional Artist Fellowships, won the 2015 award for BREAKING THROUGH Lighting the Way, preservation of the history of 12 African American female legends who made a difference in the culture of Long Beach. In  2003, Nash  received the award for continued work on a photojournalism project, part of which was published in Reflections in Black: a history of black photographers 1840 to the present (W.W. Norton 2000), and toured internationally with Smithsonian Exhibition Reflections in Black.

As a special project resulting from winning the 2003 Arts Council award, Nash produced a one-year Long Beach television series, “Arts & Entertainment Magazine,” which won her the Charter Communications 2004 TV Producer of the Year Award. Nash won the 2010 Arts Council award for continued contributions to the understanding of U.S. race relations in the upcoming sequel to her book, Bigmama Didn’t Shop At Woolworth’s (Texas A&M University Press) about life with her part-Comanche grandmother during the Civil Rights Movement, which is recognized by the Association of American University Presses as essential for understanding U.S. race relations and recommended by the Miami-Dade Public Library System in Florida for Native American collections.

Yulya Dukhovny

Yulya Dukhovny

Dramatist, storyteller and performer, Yulya Dukhovny, is a native of Russia, who lived in Israel for 16 years. Dukhovny won the 2015 Arts Council Award for her Microscope Toy Theater, a touring company which the musician and artist founded in 2010. Dukhovny produces workshops and indoor miniature productions. The independent artist is now working on her next project, “Into the Rice Fields.” The puppetry artist produces shows for children and adults, introducing them to traditional and contemporary toy theater, also known as paper or model theater, which dates back to early Nineteenth Century Europe.

Pamela K. Johnson

Pamela K. Johnson

Pamela K. Johnson, now in Long Beach, won the 2015 Arts Council award for her work on Long Beach historical documentaries.

Johnson, also a winner of a 2009 Arts Council award, won a grand prize in the 2013 Beijing International Screenwriting competition, received an American Film Institute’s Directing Workshop for Women Fellowship and an Emerging Filmmaker Grant from General Motors.

Carole Frances Lung

Carole Frances Lung

Textile artist, social activist and scholar, Carole Frances Lung, won a 2015 Arts Council award for art that emphasizes skill sharing, hands-on craft instruction and micro-economies.

Lung, under her alter ego, Frau Fiber, was selected out of 400 applicants as one of 16 participates in the 2014 John Michael Kohler Art Center’s prestigious Arts/Industry Program.

Lung is a Fashion and Textiles professor in the Department of Art at California State University, Los Angeles.

Olga Lah

Olga Lah

Artist, Olga Lah, uses common household items, such as sponges, dowels, pool toys, chairs, marking tape, paperbacks and other ordinary fare to create artistically poetic installations. Winner of a 2015 Arts Council award for her spontaneous tactile installations, Lah also won the 2014 Feature Installation for the Korean Arts Foundation of America, which she unveiled at the 2014 LA Art Show. The installation was comprised of several hundred styrofoam cylinders attached with wooden skewers

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Long Beach Museum of Art

Long Beach Museum of Art

Long Beach Museum of Art Free Event Seating is limited. For more information, please visit our website. Or call 562-439-2119 or e-mail us at museum@lbma.org. The City of Long Beach credits the Arts Council as its leading source of arts information and services for innovative arts awareness programs, initiatives, exhibitions, volunteer opportunities, youth arts programs and more. ACLB is a non-profit organization that develops cultural resources by supporting artists and the local arts community, including arts news, promotions, programs, artist resources, events and arts calendar. The Arts Council for Long Beach is supported, in part, by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Arts Commission.

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